A Year In Review: Health News That Will Shape 2019
Dec31

A Year In Review: Health News That Will Shape 2019

The past year was filled with a wide variety of advances and news in the health industry. These instances over the course of the past twelve months will help shape the future of the year to come. In preparation for 2019, learn more about these major health developments from the previous year. Climate Change Impacting Health As climate change continues to worsen year after year, 2018 showed that not only will a changing environment impact the ecosystem, it will also impact the health of individuals everywhere. More health problems began to arise throughout various populations around the world as temperatures and weather patterns changed. Diseases were able to spread in new territories due to warmer weather and more humid conditions. Additionally, a host of natural disasters left many homes at risk for causing health problems due to mold. It only takes 48 hours for mold to set in and the longer things remain wet the more likely they are to be destroyed or cause permanent damage. Not only did climate change and environmental concerns cause larger shifts in global health; day-to-day pollution resulted in health complications for the population in general. Air pollution is known to be one of the top causes for lung cancer, yet air quality continued to be a problem throughout 2018. This trend is likely to continue this year; unless pollution, in general, is reduced, it’s likely health problems will continue to grow. Health Care Costs And Coverage As health care costs continue to climb in the United States, coverage becomes more of a struggle for people everywhere, especially young families. Because of what seems like ever-increasing costs of care, many younger generations are often skipping important health care procedures. The AAPD recommends that kids and teens see a pediatric dentist every six months to for regular checkups including an exam, cleaning, fluoride treatment, and occasional x-rays to prevent cavities and other problems. However, with these routine procedures often being too expensive, many families skipped over them in 2018. The current administration has also caused a certain degree of long-term uncertainty that will set the tone for 2019 as well. U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor reignited health insurance concerns for many when he ruled in mid-December to invalidate the Affordable Care Act. While the long-term consequences of this and actual results remain to be seen, it certainly gives cause for concern as the new year begins. Conquering Diseases And Epidemics Despite the challenges 2018 posed, there were many successes fighting diseases over the course of the year. While the opioid epidemic rages on, certain areas of the country that were once struggling are now at...

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Millennials Are Driving Lower Divorce Rates, Study Shows
Dec31

Millennials Are Driving Lower Divorce Rates, Study Shows

The millennial generation is spurring a drop in divorce rates. According to a recent study from the University of Maryland, the national divorce rate has fallen by 21% between 2008 and 2017 and may continue to drop. Philip Cohen, a sociologist and lead author of the study, says the decline has largely been driven by young adult women. Younger adults, Cohen says, aren’t necessarily better at marriage than their parents, but they’re less likely to enter risky marriages. Compared to previous generations, millennials are more likely to take their partner for a “test drive” before marrying them, typically by living with them for many years before deciding to sign a marriage certificate. “I think what we’re seeing is there’s more cohabitation before marriage, or instead of marriage, and people have established a high bar to marriage,” said Cohen. “So before people get married they’re waiting longer, and getting more education and stability in their lives, and those things are contributing to lower divorce rates.” Between 1947 and 1972, the average age of an American woman’s first marriage was at age 20. The 1970s and 1980s were when the marriage age began to shift. In 1984, the average age of a woman during her first marriage was 23. In 1997, it was 25. And now, in 2018, the average age is 27.8 years old. “I’d tie it to the shifting role of women; the influx of women into higher education so they could support themselves and not have to transition from being dependent on their parents to being dependent on a husband,” said Susan Brown, the co-founder of the National Center for Family and Marriage Research. Not only did the average age of married women increase during the 1970s and 1980s, but the average divorce rate also began to shift. In 1981, there were more divorces in Texas (101,856) than any other year. The rise in divorce, Brown says, was most likely because women were able to earn their own paychecks, which gave them the ability to leave unsatisfying marriages. Today, the divorce rate for a first marriage in the U.S. is 41%. However, the drop in divorce rates in recent years isn’t only because younger adult women are avoiding risky relationships. It’s also because millennial couples are more open with each other and are willing to undergo couples therapy. Karen Lawson, a clinical psychologist and assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine, says she’s seen a significant increase in 20-something students seeking her couples therapy service in the past few years. “As a psychologist with a millennial-age counseling service, I will say I have conducted a lot more couples...

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Away From The Leather And Towards The Light: Shinola Opens First Hotel In Detroit

If you’d heard the name Shinola before, we wouldn’t be surprised. The seven-year-old company (a baby by America’s standards, especially when compared to giants like Tiffany and Co.) is currently reaching outside of its comfort zone of watch and leather goods to create a branch in a new sector: the hospitality industry. After a celebratory grand opening ceremony in mid-December, the new, shiny Shinola hotel is set to fully open its doors on January 2, 2019. Just how does an American luxury goods brand break into the hotel business? The industries do have some similarities: both sell luxury, either in material form or through an experience. In the end, up to 95% of new products will fail, and the services industry can be equally cutthroat. Despite the risk, the watch and leather goods maker saw an opportunity and partnered with Dan Gilbert’s real estate firm Bedrock to set down high-quality hospitality roots in Detroit. “The hotel is outfitted to host unforgettable events, either within the exquisite hard-wood floored ballroom, or the garden-like, glass-enclosed Conservatory, or within one of the six other dining spaces offering menus ranging from southern Italian to craft beer and snacks,” Bedrock wrote in a news release. Given their history caring for and crafting high quality leather goods, we’re sure the 129 guest rooms — with their 50 different room configurations that are “beautifully appointed with custom millwork,” boast “wallpaper inspired by patterns found during the renovation process,” and even Shinola audio equipment — will be well-treated and meticulously maintained; after all, a leather goods manufacturer knows that leather must be conditioned every six months to ensure the piece’s beauty and durability are reinforced. In keeping with its luxurious retail past, the Shinola offers unique in-house shopping opportunities. “Specially-curated onsite shopping options within historic storefronts and lining the brick alley offer a mix of global brands like Madewell and Le Labo and homegrown businesses like Drought and Good Neighbor that celebrate the Detroit entrepreneurial spirit Shinola embodies.” Add in a Southern Italian themed restaurant run by Andrew Carmellini (a James Beard winner and a Michelin Star-rated chef who has 25 years of experience in the biz), and you’ve got a guaranteed success. The ceremonial lighting of its exterior signage in Downtown Detroit took place during the grand opening in December; since it’s been proven that anyone living within a five-mile radius will see that iconic sign between 50 and 60 times a month, there’s no doubt that business will start rolling...

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Philadelphia Airport Popeye’s Announces New Carry On Menu Item: Emotional Support Chicken

Flying can be pretty stressful. Our palms are a little sweaty writing this whilst imagining careening 500 miles per hour at 37,000 feet in the air trapped in a metal tube. Delightful. Plenty of people feel like this, which is why emotional support animals have been such a topic of conversation over the past few years. As it stands, emotional support animals are calming for people who suffer from PTSD and similar disorders. They’re excellent companions who serve an excellent purpose for people in need. They have, however, been the subject of scrutiny by airlines recently because people want to fly with their emotional support animals. At first, this was fine because emotional support animals were most commonly dogs, and dogs have been onboard flight passengers for a long time. Where they’ve run into trouble has been people bringing increasingly unusual animals like ducks, geese, chickens, etc. aboard a plane, claiming that they are emotional support animals. Of course, this puts airlines in a sticky situation because they’ve no desire to tell someone that they can’t fly with their emotional support animal (legit or not), but also don’t want to have, say, live poultry on the plane. This has been a theme and just a few of the most outlandish emotional support animals include the following: a peacock, a turkey, a miniature horse, a monkey, and a pig. Studies show that people who travel with a mixed (friends and family) group typically remember their trips at least 20% better than an unmixed group. But no matter who you’re with, who could forget sitting across the aisle from a pony? Airlines have since tightened regulations on emotional support animals. This gave birth to a hilarious marketing idea that’s currently all the rage in a Philadelphia airport. Since the 1970s, the number of fast food restaurants in the United States has more than doubled. Fast food establishments are particularly popular in airports because of their speedy convenience and fair prices. Popeye’s Louisiana Fried Chicken hatched a clever plan. They released a menu item that is a handheld fried chicken carrier labeled Emotional Support Chicken that people can take on planes with them. Except this chicken is merely comfort food, not a live animal. “We know holiday travel can be frustrating, and there’s no better way to ease stress than with a box of delicious Popeyes fried chicken and a good laugh,” said Hope Diaz, chief marketing officer for Popeye’s. Their tongue-in-cheek marketing has caught the attention of people all over the world. The next time you’re nervous before a flight, perhaps your comfort is merely an order of Emotional Support Chicken...

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Affordable Wedding Venue Jubilee Hall Comes To Charleston’s Hampton Park
Dec26

Affordable Wedding Venue Jubilee Hall Comes To Charleston’s Hampton Park

Charleston, South Carolina has been a popular wedding destination for decades. With its mild climate, long coastline, and over 300 years of history, couples come from far and wide to tie the knot in the iconic city. Though Charleston boasts a number of sprawling, picturesque plantations and historic estates, the city had been lacking a publicly-owned location to host events, weddings included. Since many of these private venues can be unobtainable for locals due to sky-high rental fees, the opening of Jubilee Hall in Hampton Park plans to change that; since the building will be owned by the city, residents will be able to rent the space at a discounted rate. “We want this to be an affordable option for local people who want to have an event in Charleston, whether it’s a wedding or a class reunion or a family reunion,” Harry Lesesne, executive director of the nonprofit Charleston Parks Conservancy. “We hope this will be something people will use and embrace.” Jubilee Hall will contain both a main indoor event space and a large screened-in porch area, together spanning around 7,300 square feet. The grounds surrounding it will also feature walking paths and gardens. The building is expected to hold approximately 250 people, well beyond the average wedding guest number of 136 — even the biggest families will have room to grow! However, if you’re more interested in getting hitched on a restored plantation from 1786, oak groves and waterfront views included, you’ve certainly got options. Charleston offers flexibility thanks to a virtually non-existent seasonality: warm weather spans all year long — and so do the flowers! You’ll have limitless options during your stay; you can hop in a romantic horse and buggy ride to see the dazzling city by night, watch the sunset from the banks of the Ashley River, explore the nightlife (of which there is plenty), or hold your soon-to-be spouse close while you take a ghost tour through the Old Jailhouse. Charleston is more of an experience than a place, which easily explains its popularity as a perfect vacation — and wedding! — destination. Jubilee Hall may be originating in 2018, but it will be surrounded by estates and parks that stretch back to the 1700s — there are some oak trees in and near Charleston, such as Angel Oak, that are estimated to be between 400 and 500 years old; the ability to walk beneath them on your wedding day turns an already wonderful moment into something truly magical. Modernity has managed to mix effortlessly with the invaluable history of this beautiful and great city. No matter where you choose to exchange...

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Judge Rules Trump Administration Can’t Restrict Asylum
Dec24

Judge Rules Trump Administration Can’t Restrict Asylum

In a move that opens up further discussion of asylum-seeking immigrants, Judge Emmet Sullivan of the DC District Court struck down a ruling from the Trump administration handed down earlier this past year. Asylum Seekers To Benefit While the previous ruling would have limited the ability for those seeking asylum from domestic and gang violence, this judge’s decision overturns the July ruling. Judge Sullivan argued that the decision to limit the ability to seek asylum on the basis of categorical classification was unconstitutional. This ruling is likely to have a major impact on the way the United States is currently handling issues of immigration, specifically with regards to deportation practices. Trump’s Mistake In Previous Ruling While changes to immigration law are entirely feasible and legitimate in the right circumstances, this recent ruling claims that the changes set in motion by the Trump administration are in violation of immigration laws and policies on the basis of procedure. Because the Trump administration attempted to circumvent Congress on these policies, instead opting for procedures that would allow them to skip a Congressional vote. Because Congress is, by law, responsible for the procedures that determine the circumstances required for deportation, July’s policies do not hold, according to Judge Sullivan. This is not the first time this administration has attempted to work around Congress; it seems to have been a long-standing tactic for the Trump administration since early after the election. However, more cases like this one have recently been challenging Trump’s methods of enacting legislation, pressuring the administration to run policy changes through the normal checks and balances system of American government. Immigration Precedent Set In states with significant immigrant populations, this ruling is likely to have an impact. Approximately 43.3 million foreign-born people live in the U.S., and the American Immigration Council reports that about 10% of the people living in Indiana are either immigrants or the children of immigrants. In states like these, any change to immigration law is likely to cause something of a stir. With asylum being a hot issue as it stands, it will be interesting to see what the public response to this recent ruling...

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