The USA Gymnastic Team Is Not Alone In Dealing With Sexual Abuse Scandals
Feb22

The USA Gymnastic Team Is Not Alone In Dealing With Sexual Abuse Scandals

Swimming is the fourth most popular activity or sport across the United States, and that would explain why there is an Olympic team dedicated to it. Sadly, some of those women who have joined the USA Swimming team may have regretted it since. Just as the USA Gymnastics team members have suffered, it is coming forth that the women on USA Swimming are also suffering. Recent reports reveal that hundreds of underage sexual abuse cases are surfacing after being covered up by officials across the board. The Orange County Register newspaper released the report from many of the victims coming forward. The report is filled with details from many cases, making them undeniably bone-chilling. Since Check Wielgus took over as the executive director of USA Swimming 20 years ago, according to Dead Spin, “at least 252 swim coaches and officials have been arrested, charged by prosecutors, or disciplined by USAS for sexual abuse or misconduct against individuals under 18.” Wielgus died in 2017, and all of the blame is not being placed on him. Since 2010, there have been at least 30 coaches and officials who have been “flagged” for arrest or accused of sex crimes, from rape to child pornography. That isn’t all. Over the years, USA Swimming has been spending a lot of money to keep these abuse cases under the radar. According to the Huffington Post, $7,450,000 was spent on legal fees between 2006 and 2016 to cover up the tracks. So many women kept quiet for a very long time, thinking only of “survival,” says Ariana Kukors. Kukors was one of the many women to come forward, stating that the abuse started when she was just 13 years old. She realized that she was not the only one with a story like that, so she decided to share her tale with the world, hoping to make a difference. The Trump Administration is not ignoring this problem. President Trump signed a bill into law just last week that aims to protect young athletes from sexual abuse by regulating the governing bodies of those young athletes. This means that the officials in charge of these athletes will be kept an eye on much more closely, hopefully preventing this in the...

Read More
Can This Wearable Technology and App Prevent Seniors From Falling?
Feb21

Can This Wearable Technology and App Prevent Seniors From Falling?

Wearable technology is generally thought to be used by millennials, teens, and early adopters, but a new fall detection waistband developed at the Universitat Politècnica de València in Spain could help prevent fall injuries in older individuals. FallSkip is an Android device with an accompanying app that can be used to assess the likelihood of a fall for the person wearing it. Today, about 50% of Americans use their smartphone as their primary internet source, and the app’s developers hope the user-friendly interface will encourage seniors to adopt the technology. While patients are wearing this innovative app-based waistband, doctors will input their patient’s vitals. They will then walk around. Using the internal accelerometer and gyroscope, doctors will be able to assess “balance and gait patterns, coordination, reaction time, and muscle strength,” according to Digital Trends. “One out of three older adults falls at least once a year, which is one of the major geriatric syndromes and the second [biggest] cause of accidental or unintentional death,” FallSkip innovation manager Xavi Andrade Celdrán told Digital Trends. The risk of elderly individuals falling cannot be understated. In fact, an older adult visits the emergency room for a fall every 11 seconds in America alone. This is no small issue then, and any technology that can predict or prevent falls would help countless seniors. Though insurance for individuals over 65 is much better today — with 98% of seniors insured, compared to just 50% in 1962 — falls still happen at an alarming rate. So far, most technology aimed at addressing falls is designed to help seniors after a fall has already occurred. With a rapidly aging world population, researchers are looking for more proactive solutions. That’s the goal of FallSkip, at least, and it certainly shows promise to be used diagnostically. Their research could also help build on existing knowledge about hip fractures and their causes. A study lead by a mechanical engineer at the University of Utah suggests analyzing the human skeleton from a mechanical point of view, as reported by Science Daily. “It really starts with a small microcrack that grows over time under repeated loading,” says study leader Claire Acevedo, discussing the proximate cause of hip fractures in the elderly. The study posits an alternative theory to conventional wisdom that fractures are caused by the force of the fall itself, but rather by an existing small fracture from years of stress. The fall is the straw that broke the camel’s back, so to speak. Perhaps collaborative efforts will be made in the future to help determine both the risks of falls and what the true cause of fall related injuries might...

Read More
Researchers From Johns Hopkins Studying Cockroach Movements For New Robots
Feb20

Researchers From Johns Hopkins Studying Cockroach Movements For New Robots

Cockroaches are fascinating. They originated 280 million years ago, they can survive being submerged underwater for 30 minutes, and they can even live for seven days without their head. But thanks to researchers from Johns Hopkins University, cockroaches are going to help… robots? According to ZME Science, researchers are using cockroaches to inspire the future of robotics through movement. The research team, led by Sean Gart, a postdoctoral fellow at Johns Hopkins, have begun filming cockroaches maneuvering through obstacle courses with high-speed cameras. One the footage was captured, it was then analyzed and adapted for a cockroach-like robot to imitate the recorded movement. These robots can potentially be used during search and rescue missions following natural disasters. “Where they live, you have all sorts of stuff around you, like dense vegetation or fallen leaves or branches or roots,” said Chen Li, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and senior author of the paper published in Bioinspiration and Biomimetics. “Wherever they go, they run into these obstacles. We’re trying to understand the principles of how they go through such a complex terrain, and we hope to then transfer those principles to advanced robots.” Since cockroaches use their heads like a bumper, they often ram head-first into small structures or walls and, depending on the severity of the impact, can change their direction by using the momentum of the collision. They can even make a full flip in under 75 microseconds. The palm-sized six-legged robots could also be used to explore uncharted territories. “We are just beginning to understand how these critters move through a cluttered 3-D terrain where you have obstacles that are larger than or comparable to the animal or robot’s size,” Li...

Read More
Florida Is No Longer Exclusively For Retirees, Millennials Are Heading South As Well
Feb20

Florida Is No Longer Exclusively For Retirees, Millennials Are Heading South As Well

For years, Florida has been home to one of the largest populations of senior citizens. Millennials are starting to break that trend, however, and Florida’s age range looks like it’s going to shift toward a much younger demographic. Every single day, roughly 1,000 people are moving to the Sunshine state. Though a handful of older individuals are still heading down south to enjoy their elder years underneath the Florida sun, a large percentage of millennials are packing their bags and setting up their lives in Florida. Business Insider reports on new data from the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program, revealing the top 10 U.S. metropolitan areas whose populations of millennials (individuals born between 1981 and 1997, have increased the most over a five-year period from 2010 to 2015. Though the majority of people wouldn’t suspect both Texas and Florida to be millennial hotspots, that’s what the Metropolitan Policy Program showed. Coming in at number 9 on the list is Sarasota, Florida. With a metro population of 768,013 people, there are approximately 122,114 millennial residents living in this up-and-coming Florida city, with a younger population increase from 2010 to 2015 of 11.1%. Cape Coral, Florida tied for number 7 on the list with a more obvious choice: Houston, Texas. Cape Coral’s current population is approximately 701,982 with about 126,357 millennial residents. The increase in millennial population during the five-year study period was 11.7%. Finally, Orlando, Florida cracked the top-five and came in at number 4 on the list. Orlando’s metro population is 2.3 million with 596,785 current millennial residents. From 2010 to 2015, Orlando’s millennial population increased roughly 12.7%. So why is Florida doing so well with younger movers? Though the nice weather, the beaches, and the entertaining nightlife certainly play an important role on the average millennial’s decision to move south, so does the job market and overall financial standing of the sate. According to Florida Trend, the state’s economy significantly grew in 2017 and expects to continue over the next few months. “For 2018, from a business point of view, Florida’s economy benefits from a growing population, strong and growing employment and a rising number of visitors,” said Dr. Tony Villamil, founder and principal advisor of The Washington Economics Group and a former U.S. Undersecretary of Commerce for Economic Affairs. “In fact, Florida is growing faster in terms of employment growth than the rest of the U.S., which is good for Florida real estate.” Additionally, Florida is one of only seven states that currently don’t collect individual income taxes at the state level (along with South Dakota, Texas, Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, and Nevada). “Overall, Florida is a positive,...

Read More
Aftermath of Three Massive Hurricanes, What Now?
Feb19

Aftermath of Three Massive Hurricanes, What Now?

About 80% of adults in the United States own laptops or desktop computers, and if you’ve been on the internet at all over the past few months, you’ve certainly read all about the struggles Puerto Rico, Texas, and Florida are facing. Three massive hurricanes made landfall in these areas in the fall of 2017, and parts of Puerto Rico are still without power. Fortunately, the rest of the country is not turning a blind eye to those in need. People all across the United States are stepping up to help those affected by the hurricanes. Tiffany Brown, an Atlanta entrepreneur, was one of these people. She was awarded $156 million by FEMA to complete a job that was meant to save millions in Puerto Rico. The money was to go into over 30 million meals that were to be delivered as soon as possible to the hungry hurricane victims of Puerto Rico. How did one woman accomplish such a task? According to the New York Times and Anchorage Daily News, Brown hired a wedding caterer in Atlanta. With the assistance of 11 other people, they were to freeze-dry wild mushrooms and rice, chicken and rice, and vegetable soup. Brown sought out a nonprofit in Texas that had shipped food aid overseas and domestically, including to a Houston food bank after Hurricane Harvey, to help with the delivery of the meals to Puerto Rico. Brown isn’t the only one reaching out to help those who are suffering from hurricane aftermath. On Superbowl Sunday, the Puppy Bowl was making waves to help the animals of affected areas. Every year, the Puppy Bowl features puppies from around the world from shelters and pounds in an effort to help them get adopted. This year, they selected puppies only from areas of Puerto Rico, Florida, Texas, and other areas hit by the hurricanes. SBNation states, “thousands of pets were displaced, abandoned, or lost in those storms, and rescues are still trying to find these pets permanent homes.” It is heartwarming to see that the people who were hit by three record breaking hurricanes in a row are not being forgotten. They still need help, but this is a great...

Read More