No Injuries After Concrete Falls 20 Feet At Comerica Park Stadium

After the Detroit Tigers lost to the Rangers by 4 to 2 on Sunday, the stadium started to fall apart — literally. A piece of concrete fell onto one of the concourses at Comerica Park Stadium as the crowd was clearing out after a game.

“No one was injured as the ballpark was pretty clear at the time,” says Ron Colangelo, vice president of communications for the Tigers. Colangelo heard about the incident when stadium operations discovered it on the 100-level concourse, the area behind the first base. “The area has been isolated and operations will look into what may have been the cause.”

Bob Flynn, who was leaving the stadium at the time, spoke to Local 4 News in Detroit about the incident. He says the concrete fell at least 20 feet, and that workers acted quickly. The area is currently roped off.

The Tigers have a history with the Comerica Park Stadium, originally built in 1997. The Tiger’s first season with the ballpark was in 2000. The team is expected to play a match against the Los Angeles Angels on August 25.

Due to its durability, concrete is the single most widely used material in the world, and concrete that is properly maintained can last for decades. However, there are many reasons concrete may deteriorate. Concrete can be damaged by extreme heat or fire, salt or bacterial corrosion, and chemical damage from carbonation, chlorides, sulfates, or distilled water.

The stadium is currently investigating what caused the concrete to fall, and if any repairs or renovations need to be made. The incident is not expected to affect the upcoming Tiger’s game, but the area will continue to be roped off for the time being.

Author: Matt Dowd

Matt is a professional writer, avid traveler, and curious soul with a nose for new and interesting information. He brings his perspective to you as a primary author for InClue. Matt is constantly on the search for great information about topics ranging from human interest to technology, and everything in between.

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