10 Easy Fixes and No-Sew Hacks to Help Clothes Live Longer
Feb08

10 Easy Fixes and No-Sew Hacks to Help Clothes Live Longer

Many of us love the feeling of a great outfit. We all know that one shirt that makes us feel instantly professional, or those pants that make us feel a foot taller. Damaging or staining such a beloved item can feel like losing a friend— devastating. And, since the average American spends a whopping $1,800 on clothing a year, ruining too many pieces of clothing can be surprisingly expensive. If you’ve recently ruined a favorite garment, or if you’re looking to save money on your wardrobe, read on. Here are 10 clever repair tricks to help your clothes live a bit longer. Save a button with clear nail polish. Just a dab will prevent the thread from unraveling until you have time to sew it properly. No shoe polish? Try moisturizer. The oils in the moisturizer will give materials like leather and faux leather fresh shine and suppleness. Deodorize smelly gym sneakers by sprinkling a bit of baking soda in them after each use. Baking soda mixed with lemon juice also makes a great scrub for eliminating pit stains. Do your stockings have a run? Stop the split temporarily with clear nail polish. Spritzing the thin fabric with hair spray can also help prevent tears before they start. If your sweater has started pilling, try using a razor. The blade can shave away unsightly tufts of fraying fabric in a flash. Many swear by baby wipes as a method of removing deodorant stains. Simply rub the white spots until they disappear! Try using shaving cream to lift makeup and foundation stains off of a hemline. Blot the stained area with the cream, then toss in the wash. Baking soda really is a miracle ingredient. Use a toothbrush and a paste made of baking soda and water to whiten grimy sneakers. Nothing wrecks your day like stepping your favorite shoes in a wad of gum. To pull the stuff out of your tread, press ice against the area for 20 minutes. The gum should harden enough to be removed with ease. With so many ways to wreck an outfit, looking your best can be a chore. Try any of these smart tips to help your clothes last a little longer. With these clever hacks, no rip, stain, or loose thread will ruin your day...

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Living In An Accessory Dwelling Unit: Important Aspects to Consider
Feb08

Living In An Accessory Dwelling Unit: Important Aspects to Consider

In the United States, secondary suites are technically referred to as accessory dwelling units or ADUs. These ADUs are legally built within or on the same lot as an existing home or apartment. These living spaces provide complete independent living facilities including kitchens, bathrooms, and private entryways. There are, however, certain legal requirements that property owners need to be aware of when it comes to secondary living spaces. In order to qualify as a finished living space, a basement must meet legal egress requirements for safe escape or easy entry of rescue teams during emergencies. Many home fire deaths occur when residents are attempting to get to the interior exits, but toxic smoke and extremely heats can lead to disorientation during these emergency situations. Legal egress requirements include having windows that adhere to International Residential Code (IRC) criteria, emergency exiting plans, and fire escapes. Places to safely exit are fundamental for accessory units and each home or apartment needs a minimum of two points of egress. In addition to basement and ADU egress requirements and emergency safety, there are a few additional aspects that property owners need to focus on when it comes to accessory living, including: Electrical systems — Since the electrical service needs to be controlled by each resident, it’s important to have a quality and efficient system within the home or apartment. Each unit will need an electrical panel, and all circuits must be fed from their own panels. Additionally, electrical services should not be mixed in order to easily measure how much electricity each unit consumes. Internal Energy Conservation Code compliance — All construction projects above a minimal scope — and an accessory unit exceeds the description of minimal scope — must comply with the regulations set by the International Energy Conservation Code. This code sets rules for windows and doors, insulation, heating and cooling, fresh air intake, and many other requirements. Plumbing system — Each dwelling unit must have its own means to heat water and distribution. Plus, the unit must have a control valve in order to avoid serious plumbing emergencies. Waste lines cane shared, however, since basement accessory units are separated from the main dwelling, enabling the main waste pipes to be...

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