16-Year-Old Student To Graduate From High School And Harvard Simultaneously
Jan09

16-Year-Old Student To Graduate From High School And Harvard Simultaneously

A lot of us just wanted a driver’s license when we were 16 years old. School? That was an afterthought that we were legally required to attend. We had to be there, so may as well do decently at it. This young man, shall we say, has gone above and beyond what most 16-year-olds do. Meet Braxton Moral. At 16 years old, he’s about to graduate from Ulysses High School in Kansas and Harvard University at the same time. At six months old, children begin to get their baby teeth and should have them checked out before their first birthday. While other kids were teething, it was evident that Braxton was a bit different. At three years old, he was calculating score differentials at volleyballs games and had a substantial vocabulary that was well beyond most three-year-olds. In second grade, he was going to a different school building specifically to take mathematics and English at the third and fourth-grade levels. After that, he skipped fourth grade altogether. His academic progress was met with depression as he neared the age of 10 and started to ponder metaphysical conundrums like existential purpose. His mother and father eventually took him to a local community college for an examination that would test his academic level. That was the aha! moment. “They thought the machine was broken. He was like off the scale, beyond an associate’s degree,” said his father. They were later told that Braxton needed to be challenged at higher levels. So at age 11, he started taking courses from Harvard University’s extension program. Originally designed to serve working professionals in tandem with courses at the physical university, Braxton started taking them as a pre-teen. Not wanting to deprive him of his high school experience, the family made a four-year plan that would have Braxton finishing his high school diploma and a college degree at the same time. Now he’s set to get them both. The hardest part, he says, is that high school finals and finals at Harvard fall at the same time. In the history of the Harvard Extension Program, the youngest degree recipient was 18 years old. Braxton will receive his diploma a few months after his 17th birthday. Then he has his sights set on Harvard Law School and a career in...

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Pediatric Dental Clinic Faces Medical Malpractice Lawsuit In Wake Of Toddler’s Death
Jan09

Pediatric Dental Clinic Faces Medical Malpractice Lawsuit In Wake Of Toddler’s Death

A civil lawsuit that tallies nearly 80 pages alleges that Kool Smiles, a network of general dentist clinics specializing in pediatric dentistry, is guilty of medical malpractice. Last year, two-year-old Zion Gastelum died after a visit to Kool Smiles and his family is now prepared to go to court over the case. Staff members at Kool Smiles evaluated Zion two times prior to telling his parents that he needed baby root canals and crowns on his baby teeth. According to the lawsuit, Kool Smiles determined that Zion needed this procedure and administered this procedure after receiving informed consent from the parents. “It was overseen by an employee who was not qualified to provide the necessary advice for the procedure. The document was not witnessed nor did any dentist sign off on the document on October 20, 2017,” the lawsuit reads. New details in the lawsuit allege further instances of medical malpractice, a legal field that makes up 15% of all personal injury cases in the United States. According to these details, a staff member of the dental clinic silenced the alarm on the pulse oximeter to which Zion was hooked up. The oximeter monitors a patient’s pulse and oxygen saturation. The Gastelum family also claims that Zion was left alone in the recovery room within as little as two minutes after the conclusion of the procedure. The dentists allegedly left Zion without a properly working oxygen tank and began procedures on other pediatric patients. The lawsuit names anesthesiologist Aaron Roberts as a defendant. According to the lawsuit, Roberts did not properly monitor his young patient to ensure he recovered from the effects of anesthesia. Although the procedure lasted for just 35 minutes, Zion was unresponsive during recovery before he was flown to the Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Doctors there pronounced him dead four days later. The Gastelum family pins the majority of the blame on the business model of Kool Smiles. According to the lawsuit, Kool Smiles attempts to maximize productivity by scheduling pediatric patients back-to-back, not allowing time for proper monitoring of the children after...

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