As Flu Cases Surge, Hospitals Begin To Restrict Visitors
Jan10

As Flu Cases Surge, Hospitals Begin To Restrict Visitors

According to new reports by the CDC, flu cases are on the rise. New York City and 19 states have reported high levels of flu activity, spurring some hospitals to restrict visitor access for sick individuals. So far, there have been 1,000 confirmed cases of flu-related hospitalizations, according to Web MD. But that’s not even the worst of it. The CDC also reports that 13 children have died as a result of the flu since Dec. 29 alone. The rising number of potentially fatal flu cases has caused concern among hospitals in these 19 states. Indiana, New Jersey, North Carolina, and more have begun to impose restrictions on visitor access in an effort to stop the flu from spreading. For the already ill patients at the hospital, a sudden case of the flu might end in disaster. “Many of our patients do have a compromised immune system because they’re fighting another illness and that’s why they’re in the hospital in the first place,” said Jennifer Burrows, the chief nursing officer for Providence St. Vincent Medical Center in Oregon. Hospitals are asking that visitors who display any cold or flu symptoms stay away until the end of the flu season, which can be as late as February in some areas. The CDC claims that February has been the most common month for the peak of flu season for the past 36 years. Other hospitals are preventing anyone under the age of 18 from visiting hospital patients. Should you suffer from any flu or cold symptoms, don’t hesitate to visit your doctor or nearest urgent care location. Nearly 97% of patients who seek the help from immediate clinics are able to receive the help they needed while only 3% were escorted to emergency services. Some hospitals are combating flu season with additional fervor. For example, Scottsdale hospitals in Arizona have even begun to hand out surgical masks to prevent the bacteria from coughs and sneezes. Serious complications caused by the flu include pneumonia, heart inflammation, and organ failure, but those who have compromised immune systems are at even greater risks. Luckily, it’s never too late to receive your annual flu shot. While you might experience uncomfortable symptoms from the medicine, it’s far better than suffering the potentially fatal damage that influenza can...

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16-Year-Old Student To Graduate From High School And Harvard Simultaneously
Jan09

16-Year-Old Student To Graduate From High School And Harvard Simultaneously

A lot of us just wanted a driver’s license when we were 16 years old. School? That was an afterthought that we were legally required to attend. We had to be there, so may as well do decently at it. This young man, shall we say, has gone above and beyond what most 16-year-olds do. Meet Braxton Moral. At 16 years old, he’s about to graduate from Ulysses High School in Kansas and Harvard University at the same time. At six months old, children begin to get their baby teeth and should have them checked out before their first birthday. While other kids were teething, it was evident that Braxton was a bit different. At three years old, he was calculating score differentials at volleyballs games and had a substantial vocabulary that was well beyond most three-year-olds. In second grade, he was going to a different school building specifically to take mathematics and English at the third and fourth-grade levels. After that, he skipped fourth grade altogether. His academic progress was met with depression as he neared the age of 10 and started to ponder metaphysical conundrums like existential purpose. His mother and father eventually took him to a local community college for an examination that would test his academic level. That was the aha! moment. “They thought the machine was broken. He was like off the scale, beyond an associate’s degree,” said his father. They were later told that Braxton needed to be challenged at higher levels. So at age 11, he started taking courses from Harvard University’s extension program. Originally designed to serve working professionals in tandem with courses at the physical university, Braxton started taking them as a pre-teen. Not wanting to deprive him of his high school experience, the family made a four-year plan that would have Braxton finishing his high school diploma and a college degree at the same time. Now he’s set to get them both. The hardest part, he says, is that high school finals and finals at Harvard fall at the same time. In the history of the Harvard Extension Program, the youngest degree recipient was 18 years old. Braxton will receive his diploma a few months after his 17th birthday. Then he has his sights set on Harvard Law School and a career in...

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Pediatric Dental Clinic Faces Medical Malpractice Lawsuit In Wake Of Toddler’s Death
Jan09

Pediatric Dental Clinic Faces Medical Malpractice Lawsuit In Wake Of Toddler’s Death

A civil lawsuit that tallies nearly 80 pages alleges that Kool Smiles, a network of general dentist clinics specializing in pediatric dentistry, is guilty of medical malpractice. Last year, two-year-old Zion Gastelum died after a visit to Kool Smiles and his family is now prepared to go to court over the case. Staff members at Kool Smiles evaluated Zion two times prior to telling his parents that he needed baby root canals and crowns on his baby teeth. According to the lawsuit, Kool Smiles determined that Zion needed this procedure and administered this procedure after receiving informed consent from the parents. “It was overseen by an employee who was not qualified to provide the necessary advice for the procedure. The document was not witnessed nor did any dentist sign off on the document on October 20, 2017,” the lawsuit reads. New details in the lawsuit allege further instances of medical malpractice, a legal field that makes up 15% of all personal injury cases in the United States. According to these details, a staff member of the dental clinic silenced the alarm on the pulse oximeter to which Zion was hooked up. The oximeter monitors a patient’s pulse and oxygen saturation. The Gastelum family also claims that Zion was left alone in the recovery room within as little as two minutes after the conclusion of the procedure. The dentists allegedly left Zion without a properly working oxygen tank and began procedures on other pediatric patients. The lawsuit names anesthesiologist Aaron Roberts as a defendant. According to the lawsuit, Roberts did not properly monitor his young patient to ensure he recovered from the effects of anesthesia. Although the procedure lasted for just 35 minutes, Zion was unresponsive during recovery before he was flown to the Phoenix Children’s Hospital. Doctors there pronounced him dead four days later. The Gastelum family pins the majority of the blame on the business model of Kool Smiles. According to the lawsuit, Kool Smiles attempts to maximize productivity by scheduling pediatric patients back-to-back, not allowing time for proper monitoring of the children after...

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These Travel Mistakes Could Be Ruining Your Vacation, Experts Say
Jan08

These Travel Mistakes Could Be Ruining Your Vacation, Experts Say

Americans are getting a little better about using their vacation days. But certain mistakes can quickly turn your paid time off into big time problem. “Everyone tells you that traveling will make you more confident, that you’ll find yourself, that you’ll be creatively inspired,” said Breffni Horgan, the head of product and design at hostel-booking company Hostelworld. “That’s all true.” Still, there are a lot of things that can go wrong on your trip if you don’t put your safety first. That’s why travel experts like Dr. Talya Miron-Shatz from Cambridge University and author Patricia Hajifotiou compiled some of the worst travel mistakes you can make in 2019. The first mistake you can make? Giving into FOBO (the fear of missing out). Don’t feel pressured to visit tourist spots “A big and common mistake is to bite off more than you can chew because you ‘should,'” said Miron-Shatz. “We tell ourselves that we absolutely must cover every site and attraction, but, just like in other aspects of life, we benefit from some mental decluttering and letting go of ‘shoulds’.” The fear of missing out can creep up while you travel. You feel the need to visit every tourist spot you can, not because you want to but because you feel like you should. Giving into travel FOBO can turn your vacation into a checklist. And that isn’t fun for anyone involved. “Once we’re in the moment, enjoying the waterfall and not stressing over the four other sites we need to check off the list before lunch, the trip becomes so much better,” said Miron-Shatz. This goes for choosing trip destinations, too. New York City and Los Angeles might be Instagram-worthy vacation spots, but they’re also two of the top five worst cities for parking. Think about vacation spots you want to visit. Avoid the spots that’ll make you stressed out. Don’t be too strict with your plans You might like structure when it comes to traveling. It makes you feel less anxious and more in control. But you might keep yourself from having a great time when you rely too much on your itinerary. “Most people, when they travel, have an unrealistic expectation that everything will go magically right on their trip,” said Hajifotiou, author of Travel Like You Mean It! “It will not, and when that happens, you need to keep two things in mind. I call it the two Ps: Patience and Perspective.” Travel plans, like your everyday plans, don’t always work out. That’s why you need to have a plan B. Don’t let your vacation fall through just because some activities have been canceled or delayed....

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12 Year Old Survives 40 Minutes Buried Under Avalanche
Jan04

12 Year Old Survives 40 Minutes Buried Under Avalanche

We don’t often think about the power of snow. When it falls, we’re most likely to float away into the fuzzy good feeling of existing within a snow globe. Then blizzards happen. Storms happen. Avalanches happen. Then we’re swiftly reminded that the fluffy white stuff isn’t just snowballs and snowmen. Most roofs are — at least they should be — built to withstand snow loads of 15 to 30 pounds per square foot. That’s pretty heavy, but roofs are built for such things. The human body? Not so much. The French Alps are a beautiful snow-laden skiing paradise. Renowned around the world, they attract snow sports enthusiasts from everywhere. One group of seven young skiers was enjoying the trails of the resort La Plagne when the mountain decided it would remind them that Mother Nature is a force to be reckoned with. One boy — 12 years old — went ahead of the group before the rest of them witnessed a mass of snow come apart from the mountain and sweep him away in an avalanche. At 7,875 feet of altitude, this 12 year old kid was gone. Then the search began. Helicopters, rescue crews, and police dogs scoured the mountainside to find him. Time is crucial in avalanche rescue because beyond 15 minutes buried beneath snow massively lowers the chances of survival. After 40 minutes, dogs found him buried under the snow, but very much alive. The avalanche had dragged him at least 110 yards down the mountain. “We can call it a miracle. A day after Christmas, there was another gift in store,” said Police Captain Patrice Ribes. Other than being justifiably shaken up by the situation, he was otherwise fine. In skiing areas like the French Alps, it’s common for more advanced skiers who ride the most dangerous trails to have avalanche detectors on their person. A GPS locator built for situations like this. This young man didn’t have one and was extremely fortunate that he was rescued. Authorities said he survived for as long as he did because his breathing was not blocked by snow. He was helicopter rescued, then brought to a local hospital to have a check...

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