A Year In Review: Health News That Will Shape 2019
Dec31

A Year In Review: Health News That Will Shape 2019

The past year was filled with a wide variety of advances and news in the health industry. These instances over the course of the past twelve months will help shape the future of the year to come. In preparation for 2019, learn more about these major health developments from the previous year. Climate Change Impacting Health As climate change continues to worsen year after year, 2018 showed that not only will a changing environment impact the ecosystem, it will also impact the health of individuals everywhere. More health problems began to arise throughout various populations around the world as temperatures and weather patterns changed. Diseases were able to spread in new territories due to warmer weather and more humid conditions. Additionally, a host of natural disasters left many homes at risk for causing health problems due to mold. It only takes 48 hours for mold to set in and the longer things remain wet the more likely they are to be destroyed or cause permanent damage. Not only did climate change and environmental concerns cause larger shifts in global health; day-to-day pollution resulted in health complications for the population in general. Air pollution is known to be one of the top causes for lung cancer, yet air quality continued to be a problem throughout 2018. This trend is likely to continue this year; unless pollution, in general, is reduced, it’s likely health problems will continue to grow. Health Care Costs And Coverage As health care costs continue to climb in the United States, coverage becomes more of a struggle for people everywhere, especially young families. Because of what seems like ever-increasing costs of care, many younger generations are often skipping important health care procedures. The AAPD recommends that kids and teens see a pediatric dentist every six months to for regular checkups including an exam, cleaning, fluoride treatment, and occasional x-rays to prevent cavities and other problems. However, with these routine procedures often being too expensive, many families skipped over them in 2018. The current administration has also caused a certain degree of long-term uncertainty that will set the tone for 2019 as well. U.S. District Judge Reed O’Connor reignited health insurance concerns for many when he ruled in mid-December to invalidate the Affordable Care Act. While the long-term consequences of this and actual results remain to be seen, it certainly gives cause for concern as the new year begins. Conquering Diseases And Epidemics Despite the challenges 2018 posed, there were many successes fighting diseases over the course of the year. While the opioid epidemic rages on, certain areas of the country that were once struggling are now at...

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Millennials Are Driving Lower Divorce Rates, Study Shows
Dec31

Millennials Are Driving Lower Divorce Rates, Study Shows

The millennial generation is spurring a drop in divorce rates. According to a recent study from the University of Maryland, the national divorce rate has fallen by 21% between 2008 and 2017 and may continue to drop. Philip Cohen, a sociologist and lead author of the study, says the decline has largely been driven by young adult women. Younger adults, Cohen says, aren’t necessarily better at marriage than their parents, but they’re less likely to enter risky marriages. Compared to previous generations, millennials are more likely to take their partner for a “test drive” before marrying them, typically by living with them for many years before deciding to sign a marriage certificate. “I think what we’re seeing is there’s more cohabitation before marriage, or instead of marriage, and people have established a high bar to marriage,” said Cohen. “So before people get married they’re waiting longer, and getting more education and stability in their lives, and those things are contributing to lower divorce rates.” Between 1947 and 1972, the average age of an American woman’s first marriage was at age 20. The 1970s and 1980s were when the marriage age began to shift. In 1984, the average age of a woman during her first marriage was 23. In 1997, it was 25. And now, in 2018, the average age is 27.8 years old. “I’d tie it to the shifting role of women; the influx of women into higher education so they could support themselves and not have to transition from being dependent on their parents to being dependent on a husband,” said Susan Brown, the co-founder of the National Center for Family and Marriage Research. Not only did the average age of married women increase during the 1970s and 1980s, but the average divorce rate also began to shift. In 1981, there were more divorces in Texas (101,856) than any other year. The rise in divorce, Brown says, was most likely because women were able to earn their own paychecks, which gave them the ability to leave unsatisfying marriages. Today, the divorce rate for a first marriage in the U.S. is 41%. However, the drop in divorce rates in recent years isn’t only because younger adult women are avoiding risky relationships. It’s also because millennial couples are more open with each other and are willing to undergo couples therapy. Karen Lawson, a clinical psychologist and assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine, says she’s seen a significant increase in 20-something students seeking her couples therapy service in the past few years. “As a psychologist with a millennial-age counseling service, I will say I have conducted a lot more couples...

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