Too Young For Arthritis? Why That Might Not Be True
Nov02

Too Young For Arthritis? Why That Might Not Be True

Arthritis is a common health problem, but it’s often thought of as something that’s only an issue in older populations. However, that’s not entirely accurate. Up to 7% of all doctor-diagnosed arthritis cases are in young adults age 18 to 44, with some cases developing even younger. Rheumatoid arthritis can be a problematic health condition, causing difficulty for even younger patients. Here are some facts on how arthritis can affect younger populations, and what to do if you suspect you may have arthritis. Arthritis In Young Adults While arthritis is typically known as a condition in older people, millions of younger adults deal with arthritis and arthritis-like symptoms on a regular basis. In fact, 1 in 25 working-age adults face work limitations they attribute to arthritis. Even if you haven’t dealt with arthritis earlier in life, it is possible to develop it throughout your adult life, meaning that any current symptoms could be early signs of arthritis. Arthritis Symptoms If you have any of the following symptoms, talk to your doctor; they could be early signs of arthritis or other joint health problems. Morning stiffness after waking up Joint pain in knees, shoulders, wrists, etc. Joint swelling Persistent pain in limbs It’s important to consult with a doctor if you have any of these symptoms. Rheumatoid arthritis can be difficult to diagnose properly, so be sure to ask your doctor if these could be symptoms of something else. Arthritis Treatment Options While many people believe that there is no treatment for arthritis, this isn’t entirely accurate. There might not be a long-term cure for arthritis, but there are plenty of things you can do to reduce symptoms. Eating well, avoiding sports injuries, opting for low-impact exercises over high-impact, and maintaining a healthy weight can all reduce symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis in all ages. If pain persists, there are medications available to help ease the pain caused by arthritis, but make sure that this option is guided by your doctor. Additionally, educating yourself on arthritis can help you better understand what activities and treatments may be best for you to manage this...

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Baseball’s Postseason Beards Back In Full Effect This World Series
Nov02

Baseball’s Postseason Beards Back In Full Effect This World Series

The 2018 World Series is underway and it features two of baseball’s most storied franchises. The Boston Red Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers have a lot in common: they both have extremely large payrolls, they have future hall-of-famers on their team, and they have plenty of eccentric and entertaining players. One similarity that the teams share, which echoes the last time the Red Sox won the World Series back in 2013, is the popular trend of the coveted postseason beard. According to a Statista survey, 18% of respondents reported using beard care products every day. Some ball players keep their beards nice, tight, and looking sharp. And some players are Justin Turner and Craig Kimbrel. “I usually walk in the bathroom and say today’s the day I’m gonna cut it,” said Kimbrel, the Red Sox all-star closer. “And if anybody says ‘No,’ — I don’t. It’s gonna be a little tough to get rid of it. Though there will be plenty of bearded stars featured throughout this year’s World Series; including Turner, Kimbrel, Kenley Jansen, David Price, Max Muncy, and Christian Vazquez — this year’s beards are nothing like they were in 2013. Only one player remains on the team of the three founding fathers of Red Sox postseason beards — Dustin Pedroia. “It started in spring training, Mike Napoli recalls. “Me, Johnny (Gomes), and Pedroia were just messing around, saying we were going to grow it out all year. And it just seemed like everyone jumped on.” In 2013, as Boston defeated the St. Louis Cardinals in the World Series, their beards became a rallying point for the players, continuing to this day. Now, during celebrations and important moments, players take turns tugging on each other’s beards. Plus, Red Sox fans don real beards in support or even wear fake beards to the games to honor the bearded tradition. The 2018 World Series ended on October...

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As Interest Rates Rise, Mortgages Are Becoming Unaffordable For Homeowners And Buyers
Nov02

As Interest Rates Rise, Mortgages Are Becoming Unaffordable For Homeowners And Buyers

This fall has seen higher interest rates hitting homeowners hoping to refinance their mortgages as well as new homebuyers looking to get into the housing market. According to the Mortgage Bankers Association’s seasonally adjusted index, applications to refinance a mortgage increased by 10% for the week but were 32% lower than they were a year ago. At that time, mortgage interest rates sat at a full percentage point lower. Fewer borrowers have been able to take advantage of refinancing because they are locked into lower rates from a few years ago. The high interest rates today make it impractical and impossible to refinance, yet many homeowners have financial difficulties with their mortgage. About 63% of homeowners are delinquent in payments of their mortgage and are not aware that mortgage lenders can offer services to individuals struggling with their payments. Even these services, which often resemble refinancing, may not be a possibility for some. For those who wish to take cash out of their homes, they are more likely to opt for a second home equity loan, rather than losing their low interest rate. Those looking to buy a home are still showing a strong interest, but the affordability of mortgages has weakened considerably. The first half of this year saw a very short supply of homes for sale, driving prices up. As that situation righted itself and more supply entered the market during the summer, home sales dropped steadily. According to Zillow, the higher home prices and rising rates have caused the monthly payment on the average home to rise 15% higher than it was a year ago. And it’s anticipated that home prices will continue to rise anywhere from 2% to 6% over the next several years. Builders of new homes are especially feeling this drop in home sales. The industry expected sales to slow as prices rose in the first part of the year, but the rate of sales was well below what they had predicted. Compared with August, sales of newly built home fell 5.5% in September and were 13% lower than they were at this time last year. Despite an oversupply of construction materials, builders are slowing down on projects. Demand for homes still seems fairly strong among buyers, but affordability and rising mortgage rates have combined to make interested parties wary. Buyers may avoid investing in a home as long as these prices rise. With the variety of associated costs with moving into a new home and with the unexpected costs, customers are erring on the side of caution. After all, a rule of thumb of moving is to add an extra 25% more moving materials than you think is necessary. If homebuyers aren’t careful during...

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Lowe’s Leaves Florida Family Hanging After Botched Renovation
Nov02

Lowe’s Leaves Florida Family Hanging After Botched Renovation

The Smyth family from Tampa, Florida have been battling the home improvement giant Lowe’s as they seek compensation for a home in which they can no longer live. Three years ago the family paid Lowe’s $83,00 in full and upfront to remodel their kitchen and flooring. Today they’ve had to gut almost their entire home. Only a few months into the renovation job, Rick Smyth saw that the grout was bubbling up. This issue morphed into mold and moisture problems that affected nearly every other part of their house. Everything but the bedrooms had to be torn out. Despite the fact that the Smyth family paid Lowe’s directly for the renovation, as is detailed in their contract, Lowe’s originally insisted that they bring any problems to the attention of the subcontractor. When a customer hires Lowe’s for a home renovation, they use subcontractors to actually do the work. Jackie Callaway, a consumer investigator, connected this discovery with the improperly installed flooring at the Smyth residence, demonstrating that those who hire Lowe’s for renovations are not paying for Lowe’s employees to do the job. According to the family’s lawyer, Matthew Cogburn, a Lowe’s claims adjuster sent an email putting the blame on the installer. In the reasoning of that email, the installer was under contract with Lowe’s, so the liability sits on them. The email encourages Cogburn to contact the installer’s insurance to resolve the dispute. A spokesperson for Lowe’s claims that all of the subcontractors with whom they work must be licensed, insured, pass background checks, and follow the company’s code of conduct. The company also said that they tend to work directly with customers to resolve any issues they may have with subcontractors. In Tampa, the Scripps station WFTS has been attempting to reach out to Lowe’s for months to get information about the Smyth’s case. After months of no response, Lowe’s now says it is working with the family’s attorney to come to a solution that is fair and reasonable. The subcontractor has directed all questions to Lowe’s and declined to comment on the case. Every year, homeowners remodel over 14.2 million bathrooms and 10.2 million kitchens. To avoid the renovation disaster that struck the Smyth family, homeowners can use websites like that of Florida’s Department of Business and Professional Regulation to verify a contractor’s license and check their complaint...

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