Back To School: Penn State Student Hospitalized for Bacterial Meningitis
Oct05

Back To School: Penn State Student Hospitalized for Bacterial Meningitis

Recently, Newsweek reported on a case of bacterial meningitis at Penn State University. A single unidentified student’s diagnosis was confirmed on Monday, September 24th. The student was sent to Mount Nittany Medical Center for recovery. Students close to the patient have been notified and given proper antibiotics, and the rest of the school’s administration and local health authorities are working to prevent any further outbreaks. According to Newsweek, bacterial meningitis is a very dangerous illness that can result in serious brain injury or even death. The condition causes swelling in the tissues surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Symptoms include headache, sensitivity to light, nausea and vomiting, fever, and a stiff neck. Though most patients recover, in some extreme cases, patients who contract meningococcal meningitis die within hours. In recent years, about 4,100 cases of bacterial meningitis have been reported annually in the U.S, and the disease kills about 500 people each year. Though bacterial meningitis is well known and dangerous, there are other forms of the illness. Viral meningitis is often mild and recovers on its own. Viral meningitis can sometimes stem from HIV and Herpes viruses. Outbreaks of fungal meningitis are most rare. In 2012, an outbreak of the sickness was traced to a pharmacy in the Northeast, and it killed 48 people. Though not contagious from person to person, the fungal presentation is similar to bacterial meningitis. Newsweek did not report where the investigators believe the Penn State student contracted meningitis. However, college freshman are most vulnerable to contracting the sickness, with risk factors up to seven times higher than the rest of the population. In the past several years, colleges all over the country have reported deaths caused by bacterial meningitis, Newsweek reports. In 2013, a Kalamazoo College student died from the infection shortly after calling her family about a headache. In 2014, a student at Philadelphia’s Drexel University and one at San Diego State University also passed away. College students, and the population and general, can take several steps to help protect themselves and others from a meningitis outbreak. Everyday Health recommends several steps, including: Adopting good hand washing habits Getting proper vaccinations Keeping a healthy diet to boost immunity Getting prompt treatment for other illnesses to keep bacteria from spreading to the brain Not sharing food and drink with others Though entirely stopping the spread of meningitis is impossible, good prevention practices can help reduce the number of meningitis cases each...

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Crucial Cybersecurity Tips for Divorcees
Oct05

Crucial Cybersecurity Tips for Divorcees

In the age of revenge porn and identity theft, you can’t be too careful. That’s why anyone going through a divorce should be mindful of these cybersecurity tips for divorcees. When you marry someone, your lives intertwine. In modern times, that also includes your tech. Cybersecurity often evokes images of shadowy hackers cracking into big-business mainframes, but this isn’t the whole picture. Cybersecurity spending is projected to exceed $1 trillion between 2017 and 2021, protecting against the tiniest domestic threats along with the major incidents. A lot of divorcing couples don’t think to prioritize cybersecurity on their personal devices and accounts, but it’s actually quite important. Cybersecurity during or after a divorce process could save you two a headache or even save your life. Less amicable splits have been subject in the past to spyware, GPS tracking devices, and other tech options that would allow an ex-partner to glean private information about their target without their knowledge. Sometimes this has actually been found legal, like in the case of a divorced woman who spoke with NPR. She had suspicions her abusive ex-husband was stalking her, but couldn’t prove it. While taking her car for maintenance work, a small GPS tracker device was found in one of the car’s tire wells. It had been there for weeks. Even though the woman felt in danger, no charges could be pressed against the husband because the car was still jointly owned by the couple on paper. Technically, he had a right to track it. It doesn’t need to be an abusive or hostile situation for you to worry about your cybersecurity. Expenses, stress, confusion, and unhealthy curiosity can fuel issues with tech between you and your ex-partner. Remember that divorces in the U.S. can be expensive, ranging in cost from $15,000 to around $42,500 on average. Even that bit of financial stress can be a straining factor between yourself and your ex-partner if your bank accounts are still linked online. Tips for you to follow for your own safety: Unsync your tech. This especially goes if you have Apple products. iPhones, iPads, and Macs can all sync to each other pretty easily in a single household, but keeping them synced after separation can compromise you and your ex’s privacy. If you feel it’s necessary, turn location tracking off on apps. Applications like Snapchat can show an accurate map of exactly where your phone is located. If you feel unsafe or uncomfortable with this feature, you have the option to turn it off in the app settings. Change your passwords. All your important passwords should be changed. Your email, your banking, your social media, etc. Make them something...

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