Veterans Guest House To Host Fashion Show
Oct04

Veterans Guest House To Host Fashion Show

The Veterans Guest House in Reno, Nevada hosted a fashion show on October 4 at the Peppermill Resort Spa Casino. The luncheon and fashion show was aimed at honoring the women who have served or are currently enlisted in the nation’s armed forces. Details Of The Event The fashion show took place on October 4 at the Veterans Guest House in Reno, Nevada and featured women from various branches of the United States armed forces. The event is part of the 6th Annual Boots Meet Fashion, Fashion Meets Fun. This year’s event was hosted by Arianna Bennett from KTVN 2 News and Tabnie Dozier from KOLO 8 News Now. The show featured women of all ages, shapes, and sizes; the only requirement was current or prior military service. The models came from a wide background, representing several different branches of the United States armed forces. The models wore everything from sportswear to evening wear, and even featuring some fashion-based nods to their current or prior military service. The show even featured several dress uniforms in both modern khaki and historical blues. Additional designers for the show included Joan Marie, Labels, Scheels, Way to Go Travel, and J.Jill. Tickets went for $50, and the show was open to the general public. Table sponsorships were available at $650 for a table of ten. In addition to the fashion show, the event featured a silent auction and raffle. Prizes include “products to pamper and entertain,” according to KOLO 8 News. Additionally, showgoers were able to visit local vendors at booths, selling jewelry, clothing, candles, and other handmade goods. The show was sponsored by the Nevada Department of Veterans Services, Plumas Bank, and AARP...

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Understanding The Rising Trend In Ecommerce Markets

The ecommerce industry is one of the largest in the U.S., and it’s showing no signs of slowing down any time soon; in fact, its expected to reach a massive $684 billion by 2020. But just what is it about online shopping that draws consumers in like a moth to a flame? Let’s take a look. The Perks of Personalization The Internet may have a lot of risks and drawbacks, but it also offers unique experiences. You won’t hear an ad calling out your name as you walk by a row of brick-and-mortar stores, beckoning you to come in and check out their new styles, but when you log into an online account on an apparel site, you get a nice big hello. Despite the fact that that you can’t actually try anything on to see how it fits, you are addressed by your first name and usually have a large list of recommendations waiting for you based on previous purchases — half of the work is already done for you, and with a certain sense of customization. It’s been statistically proven that 70% of buying experiences are based on how the customer feels they’re being treated, so this added personal touch can make a world of difference for a credit-card-wielding individual. Technology Takes Off There are some things that simply need to be tried and tested in-store to understand how they feel and look…right? Wrong, actually! While certain items, like chairs/couches or hats/sunglasses, used to require the consumer to be physically present to get a sense of how they felt about the product, technology has created a shortcut in the form of augmented reality (AR). Apps like Vertebrae and Shopify are allowing customers to view products as they would look in their homes — or on their heads. “The worlds of physical and digital retail are blending, and AR provides retailers interactive ways for consumers to shop for products online,” said Vertebrae founder and CEO Vince Cacace. “For consumers, AR creates a more contextual and personalized shopping experience that makes the products they are considering come to life outside of a flat web page.” Convenience Reigns King Last, but not least, shopping online is easy. You don’t need to take a shower, get dressed, and hop in your car to buy a laptop, or a couch, or clothes anymore. There is pretty much no limit to what you can get delivered right to your door these days, usually within a week. With services like Apple Pay and Amazon Pay, you only have to enter in your credit card information once; checking out can take less than five minutes,...

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Secret History Trip: America’s Forgotten Wooden Roads
Oct04

Secret History Trip: America’s Forgotten Wooden Roads

What do you think of when you hear the word “street”? Pavement, rural dirt, Old-World cobblestones? How about wood? For a brief time in our history, wooden roads were poised to be the great American mode of transportation, more hyped-up than even New York’s Erie Canal. What happened? For such a simple topic, the history is kind of fascinating. Central New York State has historically been full of farmers and lacking in accessible roadways. Even in modern times you can view picturesque farmland and orchards while running into dirt side streets along the Finger Lakes. Back in the mid 1800s, an idea struck. What about building roads made of wooden planks? Goodness knows we had plenty of wood. Northeastern U.S. is full of harvestable hardwood, sturdy oak comprising over 52% of it. Builders promised farmers that these plank roads would allow them smoother travel, and the ability to move goods even in weather that would normally strand them on their land. Around 1844, the plank road boom began, resulting in many thousands of miles of roads being built just in New York State. the 16.5 mile Syracuse-Central Square road was the first plank road incorporated in the U.S., built for a whopping $23,000 (which equates to at least $700,000 today). Everyone was confident that the 8 foot wide, 4 inch thick hemlock boards would last almost a decade with minimal upkeep. It turns out they greatly overestimated, and the roads were rotting from snow and traffic within just a few years. The NY plank road system collapsed quickly. Investors lost their money, and farmers were greatly disappointed. Vestiges of plank road history remain, but are waning. The Plank Road Historical Society disbanded in 2007 and donated their collection of artifacts. For anyone who is interested in visiting pretty quaint towns and discovering quirky historical artifacts, bits of these roads survive today. Lengths of California’s Old Plank Road still remain today, even though it was built over a century ago in 1915. San Diego was in a race to become the traffic hub of Southern Cali over Los Angeles, and the Old Plank Road was seen as their ticket to success. In the relatively dry weather of Southern and Central California, the planks held up much better than those laid in New York. However, the cost of upkeep eventually became a burden. On top of that, smoother concrete roads were becoming a possibility. In 1909, Detroit built the first concrete road. It was only a mile long and cost $13,492.83, equivalent to almost $350,000 today. Obviously, that’s pretty pricey for a single mile of road. Nevertheless, people recognized how smooth...

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