Summer Refuses To Let Go: Schools Close Early Due To Oppressive Heat

While most of us are fully ready to embrace the cooler weather of fall, it would seem summer has different plans. Three schools in Easton county, Pennsylvania, were forced to close early due to the extreme temperatures. “The intensity of the heat over the past several days caused some the temperatures in some areas of the building to soar,” said Easton Superintendent John Reinhart. “Technicians are working to discover the causes for the lack of cool air in those areas.” Easton Area High School, which let out at the early time of 9:40 a.m. had been in the midst of a multi-year project focused on replacing and upgrading its HVAC systems; Phase I had ended just before the school year began, but the units that weren’t replaced needed heavy repairs which weren’t able to be completed before the heat warning was issued by the National Weather Service. HVAC units require regular maintenance (like changing the air filter every three months) so it’s possible that lack of care contributed to their breakdown — or maybe they were just exceptionally old. With temperatures reaching heat indexes of around 104, the schools — which included two elementary schools — couldn’t take the risk of harming the students. There are three heat-related syndromes (heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke) that can cause severe damage to those unable to cool their bodies down, especially young children who haven’t fully developed sweat glands; it’s one of the reasons leaving a child in a car on a hot day is so dangerous. Since the superintendent admitted that the elementary schools involved, Cheston and Palmer, didn’t have air-conditioned rooms, sending everyone home was the smartest and safest choice. It’s unsurprising that the heat carried on well into September considering the summer we’ve had. The National Weather Service issued multiple heat advisories, which is defined as a period of excessively hot and humid weather that creates “a situation in which there is an increased risk for health-related issues.” We’d seen and heard of those risks and their consequences all too frequently this summer, namely in the province of Quebec. By July 6, 33 people had already died from heat-related problems. Of the 18 deaths that occurred in Montreal, none of the victims had had air conditioning in their homes. Elderly people are as susceptible to heat illnesses as children are, especially if they have certain health problems already established. Hyperthermia occurs when the body temperature reaches 104 degrees and above, and it can cause significant brain and organ damage, even failure. There is simply no justification for not purchasing an air conditioner in times of extreme heat...

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Study Finds More U.S. Children Struggling With ADHD; Warns of Misdiagnosis
Oct02

Study Finds More U.S. Children Struggling With ADHD; Warns of Misdiagnosis

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and dyslexia affects one in five children across the United States. Unfortunately, 48% of parents still believe — incorrectly — that their children will outgrow these cognitive difficulties. According to CNBC, researchers from the University of Iowa found that 10.2% of U.S. children between the ages of 4 and 17 years old had been diagnosed with ADHD during a 2015-2016 survey, up from 6.1% from the late 1990s. ADHD was already considered one of the most common conditions among children, and this recent spike shows just how prevalent it really is. “With the continued increase of this condition, it is very common now,” said Dr. Wei Bao, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa and one of the authors of the study published in JAMA Network Open. In order to find the rampancy of ADHD, researchers took a look at data on 186,457 children collected in the National Health Interview Survey, an in-person annual survey conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “There might be multiple reasons [for the increase]. First, doctors and health professionals are better at knowing this condition than previously,” added Dr. Bao. “Second, the public is more aware of this condition, increasing the possibility of affected kids being screened and diagnosed. Third, biological factors may also play a role.” Despite these findings, medical professionals suggest that some of these ADHD diagnoses could be incorrect. What the findings more accurately show, is that a lot of U.S. children are having general difficulties, which could be associated with ADHD, but could just be due to various circumstances. “The increased rigor of kindergarten is leading to a lot of false identifications of ADHD,” added Amie Bettencourt, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. What the surveys are telling us, “is that a lot of children are struggling with social, emotional and behavioral...

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From Sugar Land, TX to Cranston, RI, Sunglasses Theft Is On the Rise
Oct02

From Sugar Land, TX to Cranston, RI, Sunglasses Theft Is On the Rise

An American breaks, sits on, or loses a pair of sunglasses every 14 minutes. Recently, there has been a bit of an uptick across the country when it comes to the theft of these facial accessories. Here are some of the recent stories involving sunglasses theft: Sugar Land, Texas According to Click 2 Houston, Sugar Land police are searching for a man who was seen on video stealing sunglasses from a store at First Colony Mall in mid-September. An employee of the shop first noticed the man take sunglasses off the display and placed them in his pocket. When the employee confronted the man, he returned three pairs and left the store, but five pairs of glasses were later reported missing. Anyone with information is asked to call the Sugar Land Police Department. Somerville, Massachusetts A Somerville police officer was contacted by a Saks OF Loss Prevention Agent and was informed that a male had just stolen multiple pairs of sunglasses from Saks, valued at $564.98. The officer was told that the suspect, later identified as Juan Molina, fled toward the Home Depot parking lot with sunglasses sticking out of his pockets, with theft protection devices still attached. The officer ran Molina in his mobile computer, discovering that he had three active warrants for his arrests, all for separate shoplifting incidents. Molina was arrested for the three warrants, as well as an additional charge of shoplifting. Cranston, Rhode Island According to Providence Journal, Cranston police are attempting to identify two people suspected in the theft of $1,400 worth of sunglasses. One woman is seen in a security video distracting an employee of the Optical Shop, while another selects and hides several pairs of sunglasses. Both women then left without an attempt to pay. Photos of the women were posted in hopes of identifying the two suspects. Palm Beach, Florida A woman in her late 50s tried to steal three pairs of designer sunglasses — valued at $1,225 — from a store of West Glades Road. As she was exiting the shop, she was confronted by a loss protection officer. The woman then elbowed him in the chest and ran away. As she fled, however, she left the sunglasses behind. Whether you’re in charge of a sunglasses kiosk in your local mall or are just out for a walk on a bright and beautiful day, beware of criminals attempting to make a quick buck by stealing these...

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