Tennessee Truck Driver on Mission to Rescue Animals Left Behind After Hurricane Florence

An estimated 70 million dogs are living in U.S. households, and one brave trucker from Greenback, Tennessee is being recognized for his efforts to save 64 dogs and cats from the flood waters of Hurricane Florence in an unconventional way — with a school bus. Tony Alsup, was determined to save ‘as many animals as possible’ from the impending floods of Hurricane Florence. “I’m like, look, these are lives too,” Alsup recently told The Washington Post. “Animals — especially shelter pets — they always have to take the back seat of the bus. But I’ll give them their own bus. If I have to I’ll pay for all the fuel, or even a boat, to get these dogs out of there.” And he did. Alsup, 51, started his excursion by driving his renovated school bus to South Carolina.. Within the past few weeks, he’s managed to rescue at least 53 dogs and 11 cats from various animal shelters that had been directly in Florence’s path. So far, he’s stopped at the Humane Society of North Myrtle Beach, the Dillon County Animal Shelter, and Saint Frances Animal Center in Georgetown, among others. Of course, this isn’t Alsup’s first rodeo — he renovated his school bus last year in an effort to rescue animals from the Texas coast after seeing on the news just how many animals had been left behind or in overcrowded shelters. “I thought, well what can I do?” he said. “I’ll just go buy a bus.” Since then, Alsup has also assisted with rescues during Hurricane Irma. Furthermore, there are more than 3 million farmers across America, and while Alsup didn’t use his bus, he did help some farmers to feed their horses during Hurricane Maria as well. Before embarking on his journey, Alsup fully stocked his bus with kennels and plenty of materials like pet food, toys, water bowls, leashes, and more. The number of devices that connect to the Internet is expected to rise from about 13 billion to 50 billion by 2020, so it’s no surprise that he was updating his Facebook friends and followers every step of the way, encouraging feedback regarding where pets needed help and even writing “NO ONE LEFT BEHIND” before he left. In response, one shelter posted that Alsup had indeed picked up ‘leftovers’ — pets that had long been unadopted. According to the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, approximately 4.5 million dog bites occur in the U.S. each year, but in addition to aggression, there are other reasons some pets remain in shelters: “It’s all true. Tony swooped in at 4am Wednesday morning to pick up our...

Read More
Secret U.S. East Coast Beaches For Seaglass Hunting
Sep24

Secret U.S. East Coast Beaches For Seaglass Hunting

Have you ever gone sea glass hunting? Combing the beach for a piece of beautiful sea-smoothed glass is relaxing and also quite exciting at the same time. It’s a great activity for kids, who love to find pretty pieces and show them off. On top of that, sea glass hunting is an inexpensive hobby you can actually make a profit off of — many sea glass hunters make ethereal jewelry and keepsakes out of their best finds. Some beaches across the U.S. are famous for practically being made entirely of sea glass. By now, they’ve been nearly picked clean of any ‘good finds’. These beaches below are less well-traversed by sea glass hunters. Rockport, Massachusetts Located about 40 miles northeast of Boston, Rockport is an underappreciated little New England sea town. But maybe that’s to your benefit. It lacks the traffic and high prices of MA beach areas like Cape Cod but has plenty of charm, wild-looking beaches, and local attractions. Many of the beaches in the Rockport area also feature some exciting and unique sea glass finds, like old pottery. Chesapeake Bay, Maryland This is kind of a broad location, but some sea glass pockets are scattered all about the beaches of Chesapeake Bay. Some veteran sea glass hunters have even found coveted orange pieces here, which only appear around every one in 10,000 pieces of sea glass found. Crescent Beach, Glen Cove, New York A few sea glass hunters have kept this area as their special secret, but we have generously decided share because this spot is just too good. Careful — only residents are typically allowed, and a section of this beach is actually private and owned by a military academy. You have to ask permission to access it or risk getting in trouble for trespassing. Even so, the academy used to be a chemistry school, and landfills used to be plentiful in the area. That means a ton of glass was buried here back in the day, eventually ending up as copious amounts of unique sea glass. Long Island, Casco Bay, Maine Casco Bay is a popular camping spot, so it makes sense that sea glass would be pretty plentiful here. According to visitors, the colors on Long Island aren’t that unique (mostly greens, whites, and browns), but there is a ton of it. On top of that, the trip itself is beautiful and any of the islands in the Bay are worth checking out. Sachuest Point, Rhode Island The nearby Sachuest Wildlife Sanctuary is a gorgeous and popular walking spot, but just down the nearby cliffs, there are clusters of sea-tossed rocks and glass....

Read More