Study Finds Common Cold Could Have Deadly Impact On Chimpanzees
Dec28

Study Finds Common Cold Could Have Deadly Impact On Chimpanzees

Every year, Americans get roughly one billion colds. These colds vary in severity, but usually, they can be treated with a little rest, some light medication, and a little more rest. For chimpanzees, however, the common cold can actually be quite deadly. “This was an explosive outbreak of severe coughing and sneezing,” said Tony Goldberg, a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and senior author of the new study that was published in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases. According to Business Standard, the researchers found that a human’s common cold virus, known as rhinovirus C, was responsible for killing healthy chimpanzees during an outbreak back in 2013 in Uganda. “It was completely unknown that rhinovirus C could infect anything other than humans,” Goldberg added. “It was surprising to find it in chimpanzees, and it was equally surprising that it could kill healthy chimpanzees outright.” Quartz added that the scientists that investigated the Kibble National Park outbreak also found that prior to the 2013 case, it was completely unknown that the human virus could be deadly for chimps. During the outbreak in Uganda, five out of a community of 56 chimps were killed by the common cold. Among the five dead, four were adults up to 57 years old and one, Betty, was a two-year-old. More research is needed to identify whether to not there is an easy cure for the common cold in chimps, but scientists are skeptical. It’s important to note, however, that the rhinovirus C bug is actually one of the most severe and dangerous forms of the common cold to infect humans, causing serious health concerns in some instances. “We’re thinking that rhinovirus C might be a major, missed cause of disease outbreaks in chimps in the wild,” Goldberg...

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The New Apple Watch 4 Could Save Your Life This Year
Dec26

The New Apple Watch 4 Could Save Your Life This Year

People love smart appliances like phones and watches for their convenience and aesthetics, but there could be another reason why these devices are becoming even more popular. Apple’s new watch, the Apple Watch 4, will now feature an Electrocardiogram (EKG) heart monitor in hopes of saving the lives of its users. According to Bloomberg, the Apple Watch already has a built-in heart rate monitor, but the EKG can help detect arrhythmia and stroke risks. EKGs are very common in hospitals and ambulances across the country, but they can only monster a heart’s activity for a short period of time. Apple is trying to extend the length of monitoring coverage for its wearable devices. “I can see a role for wearable ECGs as a mechanism to diagnose arrhythmia as an adjunct to what is currently available,” said Ethan Weiss, a cardiologist at the University of California. Tech Shout adds that an Apple Watch already managed to save a person’s life. Twenty-eight-year-old James Green’s heart rate was much too high and his Heart Watch app alerted him. Green went to get checked by a medical professional and a CT scan revealed that he had a blood clot in his lungs and was rushed to the hospital for treatment. Another popular feature of smart watches is their water resistance rate. It’s important to note, however, that water resistance is the rate at which a watch can withstand any exposure to water, and it’s erroneous (and illegal) to state a watch is waterproof because no watch is 100% waterproof. Apple’s new Apple Watch 4 can withstand water up to three feet deep. The tech industry has increased its focus on the health sector in recent months. It’s projected that by the year 2025, the U.S. health spending will increase to $5.5 trillion because of giant tech companies like Apple, Google, and Amazon. “There’s tremendous potential to do on-device computing, to do cloud computing as well and to take that learning, and through machine learning, deep learning and ultimately artificial intelligence, to change the way health care is delivered,” added Jeff Williams, COO of Apple. “We can’t think of anything more significant than...

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New Studies Shows Air Pollution Linked to Childhood Brain Development and Depression
Dec20

New Studies Shows Air Pollution Linked to Childhood Brain Development and Depression

Everyone is well aware of many of the negative effects of air pollution, but it might be far worse than anyone could have ever imagined. According to CNN Health, air pollution is now putting millions of infants at risk of severe brain damage. Thanks to a new report by The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), scientists are now hard at work to try and find ways to address the global air pollution issue. The report details that nearly 17 million infants worldwide are currently breathing in toxic air, potentially causing serious brain development issues. About two-thirds of the affected infants (nearly 12 million) live in South Asia and are exposed to pollution six times higher than the global recommended limits. “The brains of babies and young children are constructed by a complex interplay of rapid neural connections that begin before birth,” said Pia Rebello Britto, chief of early childhood development at the UNICEF. “These neural connections shape a child’s optimal thinking, learning, health, memory, linguistic and motor skills.” Although air pollution’s impact on child brain development is now at the top of the list of concerns, additional studies have found that depression is often linked with poor air quality as well. Scientists in China, alongside researchers from the International Food Policy Research Institute, Peking University, Yale University and Beijing Normal University have inked air pollution to an increase in depressive symptoms and overall wellbeing. The research team measured air quality using air pollution index based on sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and fine particulate matter smaller than 10 micrometers in dust form. Dust exposure has been shown to impact workers’ cognitive skills by up to 6%. “The numbers are very concerning for public health,” added Rachel B. Smith or the School of Public Health in London. Global scientists and researchers will continue to study the environment and effects pollution has on depression, child brain development, and any other medical...

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Sales of ED Medication More Than Doubling Due to Holiday Season
Dec20

Sales of ED Medication More Than Doubling Due to Holiday Season

The holidays are here and that means one thing: it’s time to buy more erectile dysfunction medication? Okay, maybe that isn’t the case for everyone, but consumers are certainly increasing their ED medication purchases to prepare for the holidays. Simply put, it’s been a very merry Christmas shopping season for the industry. According to a study published by the Cleveland Clinic, approximately 40% of men over the age of 40 years old are effected by erectile dysfunction. Pharmacies have now reported a 61% increase in demand for ED medication thanks to more purchases in late November and early December. “Christmas an be a pressure pot of financial worries and emotional stress and for men this can impact them physically, manifesting as a difficulty achieving and maintaining an erection,” said Stuart Gale, owner of an UK pharmacy. “Medication to treat this condition is limited on the NHS [National Health Service] and this, combined with the removal of stigma around erectile dysfunction, and the emergence of legitimate online doctor and pharmacy services, has led to more and more men going online to access treatment.” The New York Times adds that the ED market is expected to continue growing over the next few months — especially when drugs like poplar ED medications like Cialis go off-patient, which is projected for September 2018. “Erectile dysfunction is often a barometer of a man’s health,” said Dr. Steven Lamm, director of the Tisch Center for Men’s Health at New York University. “There is a potential for it really to be a reflection of vascular disease. You want to be certain you have the right screening procedures to rule out the person who is inappropriate to be put on this. I think the companies that are going to be initiating this field understand that. They’d have to be idiots not...

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Magnetic Fields Of Stars Can Transform Habitable Zone Planets Into ‘Oceans of Magma’

During astronomers’ ongoing search for new planets, finding habitable zones has been a primary focus. This is considered an area in a planet’s orbit that receives enough light from stars to keep water as a liquid as opposed to receiving too much and boiling it off as steam. According to Ars Technica, a group of European researchers has found something that could major affect overall habitability — the magnetic field of the star. With the proper conditions, planets in close proximity to a star undergo a change in their magnetic fields, which can cause induction heating. Induction heating depends on the sweeping of magnetic fields across magnetic objects. The fields cause the electrons to start moving, which created small loops of currents, called ‘eddy currents’. These experience a certain level of electrical resistance, which converts the unit into a weak resistance heater. The basic principles of induction heating have been applied to manufacturing since the 1920s, but this is one of the first times it’s been documented in this type of astronomical context. In one system that had multiple several planets classified as habitable zones, the induction heating process could even be strong enough to convert the planets into ‘oceans of magma’. A necessary element to induction heating, however, is the existence of a rapidly changing magnetic field. From any given star, this process requires a specific set of circumstances. First, the star must rotate rapidly. Its magnetic poles need to be slightly offset from its rotation axis, similar to Earth’s slightly offset magnetic poles. With the combination of these elements, the rotation of the star will sweep its magnetic fields across any and all planets that come into its orbit. Ultimately, researcher and science editor John Timmer feels as though this discovery serves as an indication of what could potentially be occurring on other exosolar systems and habitable zone planets, but there’s still a lot of research to be done. “It’s easy to get excited about habitable zone planets, but we have a lot of work to do to understand whether they’re actually habitable. That work includes fully understanding their stars, atmospheres, and planetary composition. And, unfortunately, there’s no technology on the horizon that will get us the planetary composition any time soon,” said...

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