Police Arrest Alleged Thief of $200,000 in Art
Dec22

Police Arrest Alleged Thief of $200,000 in Art

Police have arrested a Richmond man for allegedly stealing a trailer containing $200,000 in art, the Contra Costa Times reported. The cargo trailer was stolen on September 4. Inside were pieces of handmade glass-blown art, which are made by either free-blowing or mold-blowing, that belong to Chicago artist Alexis Silk, who planned to exhibit the pieces at the Sausalito Art and Wine show. The trailer containing the artwork was parked in front of the home of the artist’s friend and was stolen the day before the show. “The art pieces are unique, in that they are mostly of transparent human figures,” the Richmond Police Department said in a Facebook post. “The pieces are equivalent to the size of a normal human torso, so they would be very obvious if seen.” After releasing photos of the artwork, police received tips on social media, which led them to identify a suspect. On December 14, police arrested Mario Silva, who admitted to stealing the trailer full of art. Police have said that all 17 art pieces were recovered and returned to the artist. Silva had left some of the stolen art in the city’s Central District and decided to stow the rest in a storage container. “We showed you photographs of the artwork, asked for tips, and spread the word on social and mainstream media,” said Richmond police Lt. Felix Tan. “Well, it worked. RPD’s Property Crimes Detective Josh Clark immediately put his investigative skills to the test and gathered enough information he received through social media. His leads, coupled with good police work led him to [Mario Silva].” This is not the first time social media has helped police solve a crime, nor will it be the last. According to a 2012 survey of 1,221 federal, state and local law enforcement agents who use social media, four out of five officials used social media to gather intelligence during investigations. Half of the surveyed law enforcement officers said that they checked social media at least once a week. The majority said that social media helps them solve crimes...

Read More

The World’s Tiniest Printed Picture Makes Finding Nemo an Even Harder Task

In the popular Disney Pixar movie Finding Nemo, the clownfish is notorious for being a tiny creature, seemingly lost in the vastness of the ocean. Scientifically speaking, the clownfish, or anemonefish, is indeed a small creature, and can be as tiny as 10 centimeters long. But as of December 12, researchers at ETCH Zurich and Scrona Ltd. have created the smallest inject-printed color image of the anemone fish, depicting the creature as tiny as a cross-sectional area of human hair. The image is so small, in fact, that the scientists have set a Guinness World Record. The printed images measures up to an almost negligible 0.00092 mm2 in area. According to a news release by ETH Zurich, the image isn’t even visible to the naked eye — witnesses had to use a special microscope in order to view the miniscule photo The creation of this record breaking, microscopic image called for far more than your standard inkjet printer. Rather, the team of researchers used state-of-the-art 3D NanoDrip printing technology — an innovation created at ETH Zurich. In order to capture a realistic color quality, quantum dots were used. By definition, quantum dots are nanoparticles that emit a specific color of light. By tuning the side of the quantum dots, the color of light can be manipulated by engineers. These dots are notorious for their color intensity, and for this reason are often used in flat panel displays. In our snap-happy society, pictures are taken — and in turn printed — every single second of the day. In fact, 10% of the photos ever taken were taken within the last 12 months. But up until now, it was virtually impossible to print a photo utilizing nanostructured materials with this level of accuracy. This achievement is promising for the electronics and optics industry, as it suggests that there are many ways to use these materials for display...

Read More
Forbes Interviews Spend Matters’ Andrew Karpie for Insight Into How the Workplace is Changing
Dec10

Forbes Interviews Spend Matters’ Andrew Karpie for Insight Into How the Workplace is Changing

Andrew Karpie is a research analyst at Azul Partners/Spend Matters and is one of the most respected individuals in the workforce management/procurement labor space. As the business environment continues to evolve at a rapid pace, people are left wondering, ‘what’s next?’ For insight into the industry Forbes interviewed Karpie for a piece that ran at the end of November. One of the main areas Karpie touched on was how platforms like Uber and Upwork will change the way business is done. Overall, 90% of firms utilize some kind of freelance or contracted talent, increasingly through digital or remote means. “What I call online ‘work intermediation platforms’ have begun to have very significant and visible impacts throughout the economy — that is, enabling new ways of arranging work and conducting it,” Karpie told Forbes. “We are going from a place where work arrangements established between workers, businesses, and consumers were barely intermediated by technology to one where technology supports the intermediation, often 100% with end-to-end-platforms like Upwork and Uber.” Basically, technology is beginning to take the place of the middleman for these kinds of workers. Instead of reporting to a manager of some kind, all an Uber driver or Upwork user has to do is grab their phone or laptop and start finding work to do. The biggest advantage Karpie sees with the new digital platforms is that specific talent and skills will be easier for businesses to find in many ways. The downside to this is figuring out how to efficiently utilize, compensate, and ultimately classify these types of workers going forward. As far as robots go, Karpie understands the fear of automation but believes there are new sectors that might have to worry about such things as opposed to the traditional production workers. “Technology has advanced to include artificial intelligence, machine learning, and natural language processing, which can replace people in white collar jobs,” Karpie said. “I think the bigger issue is going to be: When new work opportunities are created, who will be trained and capable of doing what needs to be done, and where will they...

Read More
Why Your Spit Is One of the Most Powerful Healing Mechanisms You Have
Dec07

Why Your Spit Is One of the Most Powerful Healing Mechanisms You Have

Saliva, or spit as it’s known colloquially, has pretty incredible healing powers that the medical and scientific communities have known about for a long time. They just never knew exactly the reason why — until now. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have provided some clarity after conducting a study that was published in the medical journal Blood, according to the online news source Slate.com. Most people learn of the body’s innate healing abilities via saliva through very unscientific methods. For instance, although your gums might be ravaged when you go to the dentist, they start healing soon after. You might also instinctively shove your finger into your mouth if it gets cut, and that might seem gross, but it’s actually a proven healing method that’s probably been ingrained in your DNA thanks to evolution. The new study, which was led by Ole Sorensen, found that the white blood cells in saliva, especially morning saliva, have sticky, viscous “nets” that they can in essence lasso bacteria with and beat them into submission. In order to run the test they collected donations of morning saliva. More saliva is produced during meals than any other time, the presence of which helps counteract the acid produced by bacteria. Yet morning saliva was required because it accumulates at night and builds up a large amount of these “nets” rather than getting instinctively swallowed. The saliva that builds up overnight contains white blood cells, water, salt, dead cells, and the carbohydrate-coated protein mucin, which creates that extra sticky, stringy stuff you might be familiar with. When they separated the rest of the saliva from the protein-containing mucus and added white blood cells, they immediately released the nets. They weren’t normal nets, though. In this case they were made through different steps than normal saliva production, which basically resulted in making them better protected against enzymes that would otherwise destroy them. “The discovery that neutrophils release nets upon exposure to salivary mucins is novel and exciting,” says Jeremy Barr, a researcher at San Diego State University who discovered a separate immune system in human mucus and was not involved in the research. “This discovery suggests that the oral cavity is better adapted to protect against infection than we previously thought and may provide us new ways of combating oral diseases.” Sure it’s a little sticky, a little gross, and maybe overall unpleasant, but the next time you wake up with a mouthful of your body’s miracle substance, appreciate it for what it’s really...

Read More
Holiday Decor Tips You Won’t Want to Miss, No Matter What Your Budget
Dec03

Holiday Decor Tips You Won’t Want to Miss, No Matter What Your Budget

With Black Friday behind us and the winter holidays fast approaching, some homeowners want to do more than dig the artificial tree out of the basement or hang up the Christmas lights. Those who are looking for expert design advice can take some from Cathy Hobbs, an Emmy-winning television host and interior designer from New York City. Hobbs recently gave some of her best-kept secrets on holiday interior designs to homeowners, according to The News and Observer. Hobbs recommends using several D.I.Y. tactics to brighten up the home for the holidays. Adding a little bit of glitz and glam to the home is easy, she says, by spray painting inexpensive, tall glasses with silver or gold glitter paint. These make great candle holders. Candles might be used with diffusers, which can hold various holiday-scented oils. Filling a vase with coffee beans can also add some earthy scents to the home this season. Although pine cones, pine branches, and even walnuts may be standard decor fodder for the holiday season, they’re easy to find outdoors if you’re on a budget. However, not everyone likes to go the D.I.Y. route, and some may want to focus on making more high-end purchases this holiday season. Oriental rugs, which are typically made from silk and wool, are one trend that’s coming back, The Washington Post reported back in September. Famed for adding warmth and color to rooms, one of them even made the cover of House Beautiful magazine earlier this year. “In many great country houses,” said Elizabeth Parker, head of Christie’s rug department in New York, “rugs anchor a big room and hold it together.” Such carpets can go for a pretty penny, however, so be prepared to shell out some cash for an authentic one if buying as a gift or for your own home, country house or not. Jan David Winitz, a rug dealer profiled in the Wall Street Journal, has roughly 3,500 such rugs in his inventory. Some of them are worth as much as $60,000 or $70,000. Such carpets often sell priced by the square foot or meter, according to the U.K.’s Financial Times, and go for thousands of dollars at auction houses like Christie’s. One small 17th century Turkish Lotto rug, named after Renaissance artist Lorenzo Lotto, went for a whopping £12,230 (or about $18,267 USD) per square meter at auction, the Financial Times reported. Still, new and antique rugs, especially those hand-knotted in Asian countries, can transform a room if you’re looking to give it that pop for the holiday...

Read More