Fathers Lag Behind Moms in Reading to Their Children
Jun23

Fathers Lag Behind Moms in Reading to Their Children

Although many reports show that up to 79% of Americans read in bed, a new study finds that fathers do not read to their kids enough. A poll conducted by British organization Book Trust found that while 42% of mothers reported reading to infants every day, only 29% of fathers were. In addition, for three year olds, 71% of mothers read and 62% of fathers read. By the time they turn five, mothers stay at 75% while fathers fall to 60%. As the child grows older, the number of fathers reading continues to fall, and by 15 only one quarter of fathers read to their children. These kind of disparities were alarming to researchers, who believe that children benefit from the inclusion of both parents in learning. In the United States, where English test scores are in free-fall, and many graduate college without being able to adequately write, it is more important than ever to bolster kids’ literacy by fostering in them a love of books and of learning in general. The importance of reading and writing needs to be emphasized, and with the inclusion of both parents, that message can be amplified. The rule shouldn’t only apply to fathers, either — researchers encourage anyone who spends time with children to read with them. This means that grandparents, siblings, aunts, uncles and caregivers should also be in the equation. It only takes 10 minutes of your day to keep reading a constant. Reading to kids at bedtime in a time-honored tradition. The benefits of reading of your child are immense and can continue to grow as they get older. Through reading, they will develop language skills, remember tunes and rhymes, and gain the skills necessary to develop their writing. The study also found that parents who read to their children every day sent their children to school with a 12-month lead on the rest of their class. Reading to your children can build lifelong skills, and is also quality bonding time. Take advantage of the time with your children, and help them get...

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Victims of Federal Government Hack May Be Able to Sue, Experts Say
Jun23

Victims of Federal Government Hack May Be Able to Sue, Experts Say

A few weeks after the massive breach of private data from the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), some legal experts claim that federal employees affected by the breach can take action against the United States government. The Washington Post reports that despite the notifications the OPM is sending out to current and former employees who might be affected, some of the employees feel the action doesn’t go far enough. The breach, which some people believe was perpetrated by the Chinese government, exposed the Social Security numbers, dates of birth, addresses, and other personal information of nearly four million federal employees. The OPM is providing victims with 18 months of credit monitoring and identity theft safeguards but many worry that once those protections expire, the victims will still be vulnerable to fraud. As a result, legal experts and even some of the victims are talking about the possibility of filing lawsuits against the agency or the federal government in general. Marc Rotenberg, the executive director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, claims that there are laws in place that uphold a victim’s right to take the OPM to court. “The Privacy Act of 1974 clearly placed an obligation on federal agencies to protect information they collected,” Rotenberg said. “It also created a mechanism for people to bring lawsuits against agencies that failed to safeguard information in their protection.” However, there are a few problems with Rotenberg’s interpretation. First, the OPM took initial precautions against litigation in a letter it sent out to federal employees affected by the hack. “[N]othing in this letter should be construed as OPM or the U.S. Government accepting liability for any of the matters covered by this letter or for any other purpose,” the letter said. “Any alleged issues of liability concerning OPM or the United States for the matters covered by this letter or for any other purpose are determined solely in conformance with appropriate Federal law.” Second, the Privacy Act does not include anything about cyberattacks (which makes sense given when the law was passed), making any potential lawsuit against the government problematic. Still, Rotenberg is convinced that victims could argue in court that the government was so negligent in protecting the data of its employees that its actions were tantamount to “willful disclosure.” The agency, after all, reviewed internal documents from its Inspector General that warned it about lapses in cyber protection. “The agency was on notice that it had a security problem and failed to rectify it,” he said. There are already several laws on the books that protect victims against digital fraud. Any CEO or CFO who makes false certifications in...

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