California Residents Facing a Severe Dentist Shortage
Mar31

California Residents Facing a Severe Dentist Shortage

Over 25 million people in this country are currently struggling with dentures. For those in California, finding a good dentist to help them alleviate their problems may be more of a challenge than they expect. In the Golden State, the average ratio of dentist-to-patient in 2012 was 3.1 doctors for every 5,000 patients. Depending on where you look in California, that number could be as low as 2.4 (the San Joaquin Valley) or as high as 5.1 (the Bay Area). For patients struggling with dentures, tooth loss, or really any dental ailment, there are already several hurdles they must overcome to receive quality care. Price is a standout, as many dental procedures are prohibitively expensive to pay out of pocket, yet also not covered by most insurance plans. The complexity of the treatment can often be off-putting. And now it seems dentist unavailability is looming as well. And the news doesn’t seem to be getting better. Research shows that a quarter of all dentists who’ve practiced for over thirty years may be close to retiring. Nadereh Pourat, director of research at the UCLA center, says, “Good access to dental care depends on having a robust supply of new dentists in California, and we need a new generation of dentists to replace the many dentists who are close to retirement.” Rough economic times for California have not helped the situation, and may be driving licensed California dentists to choose to work outside the state. Figures show this demographic spiking six percent between 2008 and 2012. Is there a solution to be had? UCLA posits there might be. Small business loans, dental school student loan repayment, and better Medi-Cal reimbursement rates could help retain more of the dentists California has, as well as attract a new generation to pick up the...

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Malaysia plane saga: Your questions answered
Mar31

Malaysia plane saga: Your questions answered

The sudden disappearance of Flight 370 has raised many questions in the minds of people but so far not a single  question has been properly addressed. In this article, we will address the most common and unaddressed questions penetrating in your chambers of thoughts pertaining to missing flight of Malaysia. What’s the latest? On Saturday, the acting Transport Minister of Malaysia Hishammuddin Hussein rebuffed to rule out the possibility of any survivor. He said that “We are praying and continuously searching to find some possible survivors”.  He was totally ambiguous when he was making this statement.  He was of the opinion that I did not want to give false hopes but I myself not sure about this ambiguity. To confirm it, a private news agency made to a call to aviation specialist John Ransom and asked him the same question.  John said that “there are very least chances of survival in such situation but we cannot rule out that all are dead”. Wait a minute. Didn’t I hear a few days ago that there was no chance of survivors? Yes, it is absolutely right. Malaysian authorities made this statement few days ago but it did not expect the anguish and anger of the relatives of missing passengers. Malaysian authorities forwarded the following text message to all relatives: Many relatives were angered Monday when they received this bluntly worded text message: “Malaysia Airlines deeply regrets that we have to assume beyond a reasonable doubt that MH370 has been lost and that none of those on board survived,” it read. After receiving this message, Cheng Li Ping said to a private TV channel that “My heart cannot handle it and I do not know what happened to my husband”. Where is the new search area? The next search area is of 1100 kilometers northeast of where the last search had been concentrated. It is off to West coast of Australia and 644 kilometer closed to Australian land. But what about all those floating objects spotted by satellites? The acting Transport Minister of Malaysia Hishammuddin Hussein said that “the new search area could be a turning point and it is supposed to be very important”.  On the other hand, Australian Maritime Safety Authority general manager of emergency response John Young said that “We have found nothing and on the basis of provided satellite images we could not confirm that it was the debris of the missing jet”. Could currents have carried the debris there? Oceanographer Charitha Pattiaratchi of University of Western Australia said that “I do not think the new zone would be having any debris of the missing jet and the...

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Wisconsin beats Arizona in overtime
Mar31

Wisconsin beats Arizona in overtime

Wisconsin has finally defeated Arizona in overtime and made its way to the final four. In this west regional final, the Frank Kaminsky had 28 points and 11 rebounds for Wisconsin and it was inevitably a great victory. It is said that the badgers of Wisconsin have gone through their first final four since the year of 2000 and Bo Ryan the 69 year old coach earned his 704th career victory through this unforgettable basketball match. Apart from this, Nick Johnson got the ball with a chance to win, but unfortunately he missed a shot that resulted in the buzzer for Arizona (33-5). Besides, Aaron Gordon had 18 rebounds where as Johnson led the Wildcats with 16 points in this regional final....

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New Google Map Gallery Additions Highlight Home Energy Crisis in Southeast
Mar28

New Google Map Gallery Additions Highlight Home Energy Crisis in Southeast

Two recent additions to the Google Maps Gallery highlight a startling overlap between poverty and the percentage of income paid in utility bills. According to the maps, provided by the environmental non-profit organization Appalachian Voices, the poorest regions of the Southeastern part of the United States pay a high percentage of their income in utility bills. The maps also showed that families all over the Southeast pay more across the board for electricity when compared to the U.S. average. Fully 3% of Southeastern families’ incomes go to heat and electricity. That number jumps to 20% for low-income families. What could be causing the disparity? Rory McIlmoil, director of energy policy at Appalachian Voices, says the weather of the Appalachian region is unpredictable and dynamic. “We have more extreme changes in weather than other areas of the country,” says McIlmoil. “That can definitely contribute to higher demand and higher costs.” Lower-income homes are more likely to be poorly weatherized and poorly insulated, and also more likely to contain more outdated, inefficient appliances and HVAC systems. As we move further into the 21st Century, it’s important to remember that a furnace or heater built in 2002 is now a 12-year-old piece of equipment, and virtually antique when compared to the state-of-the-art options available today. Updating an antiquated heating and/or cooling system can significantly reduce an annual utilities budget, but a new system in an inefficiently insulated home can still bleed energy and, consequently, money. However, for many low-income families, updating their entire HVAC system and improving their insulation may not be financially possible, even with assistance. Some programs are in place, but availability is an issue. According to McIlmoil, “Only one out of eight residents, at most, has access to financing for home energy...

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Daring Escape from Houston Apartment Building Fire
Mar26
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